Tag Archive | Nicola Cornick

The Forgotten Sister by Nicola Cornick

Parallel Lives

The Forgotten Sister by Nicola Cornick is a marvellous time-slip novel that has its roots in fact. The story has two time periods – 1550’s and present day. Actual historical figures are within the tale including Elizabeth I and Robert Dudley. They were both familiar to me as a historian.

The novel is an exciting read as both stories run parallel, causing the reader to read with heart racing. As the action flows, we are powerless to prevent the conclusion.

I loved the characters. They were well drawn and realistic. The leading ladies were very likable and easy to empathise with. A couple of characters elicited feelings of dislike as my emotions were guided by the pen of Nicola Cornick.

I was familiar with many of the locations. It gave me a thrill to read of Hales Owen in Worcestershire, as we actually go to Lifecentral, a church in Halesowen.

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House Of Shadows by Nicola Cornick

A Love Through Time

House Of Shadows by Nicola Cornick is a fascinating and compulsive contemporary and historical read. Fact and fiction combine under the author’s skilful imagination.

The novel is mainly set in present day but travels back to the late seventeenth century and the early nineteenth century. It is an epic tale of myths, love, curses and ancient artefacts which wield their power. The reader is enthralled as we try to predict the action.

There are missing persons to be found in the past and present – men who disappeared leaving no trace.

A great love travels down the ages. It is a love that refuses to die but is continually reborn.

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The Woman In The Lake by Nicola Cornick

Mirroring The Past

The Woman In The Lake by Nicola Cornick is a fascinating dual timeline novel that had me gripped from the start.

The action alternates between 1763 and present day. The storylines mirror each other. There are cruel men who abuse their wives but underestimate the inner strength that the women possess.

Greed, power and obsession dominate with the desire for more. A strange power travels across the centuries as characters grapple with a fixation on certain objects that seem to wield other worldly powers.

The main females are a blend of strength and weakness. “It didn’t matter how much people told her that it had not been her fault… the guilt and the shame were difficult emotions to shift.” Abuse is never the victim’s fault, although we are very good at blaming ourselves. Anyone who is abused must get out and seek help.

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